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Archive for February, 2015

Another Case of IE and Outlook Crashes

Posted by William Diaz on February 26, 2015


I haven’t done one of these in quite awhile. So without further ado.

The symptom: Internet Explorer 11 and Outlook were crashing*. This was happening in all cases after applying a new task sequence. The event viewer did not produce any events that would help so I configured the system to capture crash dumps for applications. After rebooting, I reproduced the crash by simply opening IE an grabbed one of the dumps and ran it through an x86 debugger (by default, the 32bit Content tabs in IE 11 run as 32bit processes). Using ! analyze –v command produced the following output:

STACK_TEXT: 
WARNING: Frame IP not in any known module. Following frames may be wrong.
0339e974 6818a97d 005a09f8 0339e994 5226b9f5 0x490054
0339e9d8 68193c6f 0059f730 0059f7ec 5226bb49 D3D10Level9!UMAdapter::UnderlyingGetCaps+0x31
0339eb64 681940c2 0059f730 0339ebb4 00000002 D3D10Level9!UMAdapter::Open+0x165
0339eb98 69e0cae6 0339ebb4 523e5d23 00020009 D3D10Level9!OpenAdapter10_2+0x45
0339ebdc 69de09c2 005a09f8 0059f35c 69dda858 d3d11!NDXGI::CUMDAdapter::CUMDAdapter+0x18b
0339edc8 69de05fd 0339f0f0 00000002 00000029 d3d11!CCreateDeviceCache::CUMDAdapterCache::Load+0x1fc
0339ee18 69de12f3 0339f0b8 0339ee90 00009300 d3d11!CCreateDeviceCache::CAdapterCache::ResolveUMDAndVersion+0xc8
0339f1f4 69de1e4e 00000000 00595190 00000000 d3d11!D3D11CoreCreateDevice+0x353
0339f484 69de1bdd 00595190 00000000 00000000 d3d11!D3D11CreateDeviceAndSwapChain+0x268
0339f4bc 5bd5b4ed 00595190 00000000 00000000 d3d11!D3D11CreateDevice+0x2c
0339f4f8 5bd5c698 00000001 0339f58c 0339f564 mshtml!CDXGIHelper::CreateD3DDevice+0x48
0339f520 5bd5bc31 72657200 001af5f2 005910fc mshtml!CDXHelper::CreateD3D11Device+0x99
0339f6fc 5bd5ba45 00000000 00000000 00000000 mshtml!CDXResourceDomain::EnsureD3DDevice+0x82
0339f718 5bd5b9ad 00000000 00000000 00000000 mshtml!CDXResourceDomain::Initialize+0x67
0339f734 5bb35771 5c81e03c 00000000 00000000 mshtml!CDXResourceDomain::Create+0x48
0339f76c 5bd5a4c9 0339f78c 00000000 00538c78 mshtml!CDXResourceDomain::EnsureSharedDomain+0xa9
0339f7a0 671015ca 670b21cc 00000000 00000000 mshtml!CDXResourceDomain::EarlyStartDisplaySystem+0xe8
0339f7a4 670b21cc 00000000 00000000 00545cf8 ieframe!DirectUI::TouchEdit2::_UpdatePrompt+0x22
0339f7bc 77647df9 00538c78 744d2d1c 0053b958 ieframe!ExecuteWorkItemThreadProc+0x30
0339f830 77632b65 00538c78 00545cf8 744d2cbc ntdll!RtlpTpWorkCallback+0x11d
0339f990 76d6339a 0053b950 0339f9dc 7761bf32 ntdll!TppWorkerThread+0x572
0339f99c 7761bf32 0053b950 744d2cf0 00000000 kernel32!BaseThreadInitThunk+0xe
0339f9dc 7761bf05 776325c1 0053b950 ffffffff ntdll!__RtlUserThreadStart+0x70
0339f9f4 00000000 776325c1 0053b950 00000000 ntdll!_RtlUserThreadStart+0x1b

STACK_COMMAND:  ~2s; .ecxr ; kb

SYMBOL_STACK_INDEX:  0

SYMBOL_NAME:  unknown!printable+0

FOLLOWUP_NAME:  MachineOwner

MODULE_NAME: unknown

IMAGE_NAME:  unknown

DEBUG_FLR_IMAGE_TIMESTAMP:  0

 

I know D3D is Microsoft Direct X. To validate this, simply run the command lmvm d3d11:

0:002> lmvm d3d11
start    end        module name
69dd0000 69f45000   d3d11      (pdb symbols)          c:\symbols\d3d11.pdb\A40CED7361AB405886384123277BE23F1\d3d11.pdb
    Loaded symbol image file: d3d11.dll
    Image path: C:\Windows\System32\d3d11.dll
    Image name: d3d11.dll
    Timestamp:        Wed Mar 27 18:48:45 2013 (5153774D)
    CheckSum:         0017E157
    ImageSize:        00175000
    File version:     6.2.9200.16570
    Product version:  6.2.9200.16570
    File flags:       0 (Mask 3F)
    File OS:          40004 NT Win32
    File type:        2.0 Dll
    File date:        00000000.00000000
    Translations:     0409.04b0
    CompanyName:      Microsoft Corporation
    ProductName:      Microsoft® Windows® Operating System
    InternalName:     D3D11.dll
    OriginalFilename: D3D11.dll
    ProductVersion:   6.2.9200.16570
    FileVersion:      6.2.9200.16570 (win8_gdr.130327-1526)
    FileDescription:  Direct3D 11 Runtime
    LegalCopyright:   © Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

 

A good guess is that the issue we are encountering is graphics driver related.

I wanted to see if that was the case with Outlook as well. However, that would require a different approach as Outlook was not producing any crash dumps to run through the debugger. Although there are several ways to work around this, the simplest and most GUI friendly is to use DebugDiag from Microsoft. I wrote about this sometime ago and it has since moved to version 2.1 but the approach I still the same for the most part. I simply ran DebugDiag Collection, created a crash rule, specified outlook.exe as the process. After starting Outlook, several dumps were generated. When complete I then launched DebugDiag Analysis, selected the last dump and then selected Start Analysis. The report generates as an htlm file and opens automatically in IE.

The analysis takes some of the guess work of how to proceed when you have little or no understanding of WinDbg. I could see my suspicion that the issue common to both IE and Outlook was the same, which does not surprise me as they both share common modules.

image

As a proof of concept, one way to test issues you suspect may be graphics related to IE if your system uses dedicated graphics is to disable GPU rendering in IE. This is done by going into the Control Panel > Internet Options > Advanced > and checking Use software rendering instead of GPU rendering (note, although the asterisk indicates you should restart your computer, only restarting IE may be required). In my case, this corrected the problem with IE so I was sure now that the issue was related to the graphics card. Before updating the driver, I checked the display information to see if perhaps the drivers were missed and maybe generic drivers were installed. This didn’t seem to be the case:

image

I would still update the drivers anyway. After doing so, both Internet Explorer and Outlook opened without crashing. Interestingly, after updating the drivers, the workstation reported a different video adapter model:

image

In the end, the resolution was to install the correct graphics drivers during the task sequence.

Note, in some cases the crashing application may report via WER (windows error report) popup. If you examine the details, you may note that the fault module name contains a stackhash code a7aa, which is often a indicator that the issue is likely related to a driver issue for the video subsystem:

SNAGHTML31458dc0


*Oddly enough, I could not reproduce the issue when connected remotely using RDP. This should have been a clear indicator as to what the issue really was because RDP does not use the host system’s graphics drivers but those of the connecting system instead. 

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