Windows Explored

Everyday Windows Desktop Support, Advanced Troubleshooting & Other OS Tidbits

The Case of the Phantom Proxy Settings

Posted by William Diaz on December 3, 2015


Not too long ago we began to notice that users who were opening IE after logging onto some workstations or Citrix servers they did not have a previously existing profile on were getting proxy settings applied in IE that were not being defined in any group policy object. Our local office proxies are applied later in the GPO processing so if it was anything coming before that, it should have been overridden by local GPO. The quick remedy was simply wait for policy to apply in the background or manually run gpupdate. But we still needed to address the cause as in some cases the proxy server was no longer reachable, preventing users from getting out to the Internet.

To get an idea of what might be happening, we deleted a profile from a machine and logged onto it. We then fired up Process Monitor and left it running while launching Internet Explorer for the first time. After verifying that incorrect proxy setting was getting applied, we stopped the trace and the log was sent my way. Proxy settings are applied in the registry so I knew I would be looking only at registry events, searching for the string of proxy server name in the log, and specifically looking at the operation for RegSetValue. From here, it was a simple matter of opening the Properties for that Event and going to the Stack tab.

clip_image001

The component setting the phantom proxy server (iedkcs.dll) was coming from the Internet Explorer Admin Kit or IEAK. This is otherwise known as Active Setup and its what IE will use when it is initially launched by a new user logon if the IE install was configured using IEAK. Also known as Branding, Active Setup for IE looks for INSTALL.INS if it defined in the registry. You can find this file in Program Files (x86)\Internet Explorer\CUSTOM. Looking in the INSTALL.INS, I could see under [ConnectionSettings] the phantom proxy server. You can read about the internals of this here: https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2029043

At first this was a bit baffling because I had setup the rollout for IE11 using the standalone IE11 MSU and required dependencies and not the IEAK. However, after glancing at the INSTALL.INS file again, I noticed this was actually coming from an earlier IE 9 deployment, which was created using IEAK by my IE predecessor:

image

To correct, I referred back to https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2029043 and concluded that this could be avoided by going to [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Active Setup\Installed Components\>{2A2F9EE5-7FE3-44E8-AD75-72B5704DBCB4}] and deleting "StubPath"="RunDLL32 IEDKCS32.DLL,BrandIE4 CUSTOM".

To correct on new workstations going forward, I simply created a REG DELETE command in the Task Sequence after the IE11 setup to remove the value. For existing machines, a GPP registry is the easiest way to go.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
%d bloggers like this: